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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
and a house committee is set to look whether or not it should actually continue. chief correspondent jim angle is live in washington with more. hi, jim. >> reporter: hello, jenna. what started out as an effort to by ronald reagan to help people in rural areas to have a phone in case of emergencies what critics suspect is a new welfare program, listen. >> the cost has gone from $143 million a few years ago, to $2.2 billion today, a 15 times increase. >> reporter: now the cost of the program lept after cell phones were added in 2008. only those on low income programs such as welfare and food stamps legally qualify. but lawmakers say the program is out of control. >> i got a solicitation for a free phone at my apartment which is certainly not in a building where you're going to have people who are qualified for free phones. there is clearly money being wasted here. >> the fcc said in a recent year there were 270,000 beneficiaries that had more than one of these subsidized cell phones that is completely against the law right there. >> reporter: now funded by a small tax on all phone bills you can
afternoon. to help us through the issues of the day today ambassador jim jones, former u.s. ambassador to mexico will be here in studio with us. igor volsky, of course here as he is every tuesday from think progress and a very exciting guest today and an unusual guest, randy couture a former mma boxing star, a boxing star and an mma star and a great actor, too. extenders? >> expendables. i think he's a chump and i'm going to tell him that to his face. >> bill: he will crush you! >> you're probably right. >> bill: he will crush you. >> you're definitely right! >> bill: i have a friend who wrestled with him. >> no kidding! >> bill: he told him didn't stand a chance. flattened him out. >> if you're not familiar with randy, go online and do a google image search for him. >> bill: i'm afraid of him already. >> there are a lot of pictures of him with his shirt off. he is chilled out of rock. >> bill: i'm afraid of him already. i'm going to have cyprian come in and stand alongside of me. >> your body guard? [ laughter ] perfect. >> bill: all right. and yes indeed, they're whining about air tr
tsavraev, at the request of the russian government. cnn's national political correspondent jim acosta joins us from washington now with what's going on. a lot of frustration, a lot of what ifs, could if this boston magnificent y massacre been prevented? those are the questions that will be brought forward today. >> that's right, wolf. it will be playing out on capitol hill. the senate intelligence committee has set a hearing for 2:30 this afternoon with fbi officials, they will be the lead briefers at this hearing. i'm told from a source of that committee. lawmakers want to find out if federal investigators somehow failed to see big red flags coming from tamerlan tsavraev. as lawmakers are praising authorities for the quick work in the boston bombing case, members of congress are still calling for hearings, into the fbi's handling of dead suspect tamerlan tsavraev, who traveled back to a dangerous region of russia, just last year. >> what did he do, when he went back for six months? sit in his aunt and uncle's home for six months or doing something else? and when he came back to this countr
program, dr. jim walsh. have you done any studies as far as cost/benefit? because that's the other thing i'm concerned about, the ramping-up of security and the billions of dollars being spent. is it being spent with some benefit? >> yeah, it's a great question. i was in boston on 9/11 sitting in front of a camera like this talking about the challenges that day. and you know, i find myself years later in the same situation. and in that intervening time, we've spent a lot of money and a lot of time and effort trying to improve security and trying to train, prepare, implement rules that would make the country safer. and so i have two reactions to what you're saying. on the one hand it seems evident to me, as i've watched events unfold this week in boston, that we have learned. we are better at this than we were before. that's not to blame folks on 9/11. that was a different scale attack. it's the first time we dealt with it. any time you deal with something the first time you're not going to be very good at it. but it's clear that we're way better at this, way better prepared, and training a
with international security expert with the mit security studies program, dr. jim walsh. have you done any studies as far as cost/benefit? because that's the other thing i'm concerned about, the ramping-up of security and the billions of dollars being spent. is it being spent with some benefit? >> yeah, it's a great question. i was in boston on 9/11 sitting in front of a camera like this talking about the challenges that day. and you know, i find myself 12 years later in the same situation. and in that intervening time, we've spent a lot of money and a lot of time and effort trying to improve security and trying to train, prepare, implement rules that would make the country safer. and so i have two reactions to what you're saying. on the one hand it seems evident to me, as i've watched events unfold this week in boston, that we have learned. we are better at this than we were before. that's not to blame folks on 9/11. that was a different scale attack. it's the first time we dealt with it. any time you deal with something the first time you're not going to be very good at it. but it's clear that w
writing. he has been questioned since yesterday. cnn international security analyst jim walsh is joining us with more on what's going on. one of the key questions, the weapons that they have, the weapons that eventually killed an m.i.t. police officer, seriously injured another local law enforcement officer. do we have any idea where they got those weapons? >> not yet. and i think that question also extends to the explosives, as well. but this is an investigation pursuing lots of lines of inquiry both foreign and domestic. i would have to guess, though, that rather than risk acquiring weapons and explosives from abroad, it's much more likely they were acquired domestically. >> these two guys apparently didn't have much money, but enough to buy explosives, pressure cookers, a rifle, long rifle according to the watertown police chief i spoke with. other weapons, as well. >> i'm sure they're already well into the suspect's computer files and financial records. we're getting a mixed picture because on the one hand, they seem to have had a modest style of living. on the other hand, there is t
now. u.s. remember at the beginning of the iraq war, jim asked me a question, does this still hold true today? do movie stars need be afraid to speak out? and i would say, yes. the lesson is, if what you care about is your pocketbook, if you want to speak out and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong, you'll never get in trouble. if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you belief, as a citizen -- remember, we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everybody, at least from the beginning, white, male, 2 1, with property, could vote. since then we've expanded -- well, i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who was sovereign, that we were sovereign. the american revolution declared the people sovereign rather than a king or queen. you couldn't have a king or queen taking your land away because they had finch it to you through sovereign rights. so if every citizen has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government, we would think we could respect that, and yet at the very begi
. and welcome to both of you. >> thank you. >> brown: jim jones, indisputable that the united states practiced torture. at the time the justice department said otherwise, that within very strict rules this was not torture. what made you say this was? >> well, an exhaustive study of the laws of court cases, of the practice, of interviews and the summary of all of it was it was indisputable there was torture in many cases. >> brown: just to be clear: you didn't have subpoena power here and so how were you doing it? you said by talking to people? >> well, the staff and some of the panel members visited several countries, visited the black sites where some of these were in poland, lithuania, et cetera, they talked to officials, they talked to detainees themselves, and they did an exhaustive research of the law and the united states has even brought prosecutions for the very same things that we did in some of those sites. >> brown: david irvine, former u.s. ambassador john bolton told the kwra +*eup that "this report is completely divorced from reality." the procedures were in his words "lawyered a
reform was being debated former senator jim demint from south carolina told his colleagues the need to vote against obama cared cared we need to break the obama administration. senator mcconnell for senate majority leader from the republicans announcing in 2010 that his highest priority, the senate majority leader was making barack obama the one-term president. if we had a coalition presidency were each party would elect a partner it wouldn't stand to gain as much clinical opposition. no matter what they did it was still share the white house with the other party so then it would be much freer to judge legislative proposals on their merits. so to put it another way, it's not surprising when you have a winner-take-all election for presidency whose power has grown to a level of the presidency you shouldn't be surprised that we have high levels of partisan conflict. indeed if you go back the increase in partisan conflict, to go back to the 50s and 60's there is much more of a cross party lines. if you look at partisan conflict graph it has risen since the 40s in the 50s grassley to lev
joking that jim demint should run for president. this isn't exactly what i had in mind. [laughter] perhaps he misunderstood me. you know, the ting that makes jim -- the thing that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like matt spaulding and the heritage foundation itself so valuable; that is, your shared insistence on making the positive case on conservativism, what conservatives are for. in washington it's common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats stand opposed to each other, obviously, in outspoken partisanship is what almost always gets the most headlines. this negativity is unappealing on both sides, and that helps explain why the federal government is increasingly held in such low regard by the american people. but for the left the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose today is to defend its past gains from conservative reform. but negativity on the right, to my mind, makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative that liberals are for things, and conse
promise to find it just for you right here on "mad money." i'm jim cramer. thank you, everybody. see you tomorrow! >>> good evening, everyone. i'm larry kudlow. this is "the kudlow report." let's get started right away. the big story today a shocking but fake tweet and from the associated press and set off a steep stock market selloff and then just as suddenly, a stock market rebound. what on earth happened? cnbc's own eamon javers joins us with this incredible story. good evening. >> it was a really bizarre turn of events starting at 1:07:00 p.m. here's the tweet that the a.p. account put out at that minute. it said, "breaking" two explosions in the white house and barack obama is injured. that was a fake report as a result of a hack attack against the a.p. twitter account. but it set off this reaction in the dow jones industrial average, as you see from the chart, a huge spike down on that news. down about 143 points at the bottom. and then bouncing right back up, all of that happening within the space of about three minutes. and by sheer coincidence, the white house briefing was set t
gifford has an op ed this morning. jim is a republican. what you think about what the senate did? we havehere in delaware plenty of gun laws. sure that is the case in a lot places in the country where somebody gets arrested with a gun crime, usually they are able to eliminate that. they do not prosecute for illegal guns. there are plenty of guns laws already. it is just a matter of having the prosecutors have in the nerve to enforce these laws. this is just another attempt by the federal government to disarm the people of the united states and it is not going to make any favorites. lot of this is a distraction from the economy and the fact they refuse to do anything to cut back on the sides of the government. host: are you a gun owner? caller: i do not own a gun but pretty much everyone else i know owns a gun. -- here ins castle new castle, a lot of people did not have guns. guns start leaking out towards this area. people are very open a round here about gun under ship. about gun ownership. are there any further regulations you would support on gun buying? isler: no, i just think it
thing in the world can happen to a city and dumb sportscasters will go, three hours, jim, this city forget there was a nuclear blast. >> something different was going on there. >> here, it can only happen in boston because boston is a one sports team town. at the end of the day, the sox that pull the entire team together. >> fenway. >> and fenway, the cathedral to a city. it had to be an amazing day there. >> it was. it was an amazingly emotional afternoon. it was a cathartic moment. a baseball game happened to have been played but it was if a tiny basilica on the back bay and the region was attracted to it. the suspected suspect had been successfully captured the evening before. neil diamond called the red sox switchboard. >> are you kidding me? >> called the red sox switchboard and said i'm in town, my name is neil diamond. i'd like to come and sing the song and he showed up. >> wow. >> to the surprise -- >> which, of course, people are watching that don't know, that's been a tradition. >> yeah, for a long, long time, many years. middle of the eighth inning, they sing it. >> it's
that i served in the senate choking or half joking that jim demint should run for president. this is not exactly what i had in mind. perhaps he misunderstood me. the thing that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like max balding and the heritage foundation so valuable. you are sharing assistance on making a positive case for conservatives, what conservatives are for. in washington is common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats are opposed to each other in an outspoken partisanship. it is what almost gets the most headlines. this negativity is not appealing on both sides. that helps explain why the government is increasingly held in such beauregard by the american people. for the left, the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose is to defend its past gains from conservative reform. negativity on the right to my mind makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative liberals are for things and conservatives are against things. when we concede this narrative w
joking that jim demint should run for president. this is not exactly what i had in mind. perhaps he misunderstood me. the thing that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like mike spaulding and the heritage foundation so valuable. you are sharing assistance on making a positive case for conservatives, what conservatives are for. in washington it is common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats are opposed to each other in an outspoken partisanship. it is what almost gets the most headlines. this negativity is not appealing on both sides. the helps explain why government is increasingly held in such low regard by the american people. for the left, the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose is to defend its past gains from conservative reform. negativity on the right to my mind makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative. liberals are for things and conservatives are against things. when we concede this narrative, we concede the debate before the debate begins. ye
.s. chief national correspondent jim angle tells us money, power and influence are on the line. >> experienced with terrorists here at home, the u.s. is trying to avoid encouraging them overseas, as secretary of state john kerry arrived in turkey where he plans to announce an increase in not only aid to the syrian rebels of up to $10 million. as he empty with syrian opposition leader, the memories of boston were still fresh on his mind. and he spread his sorrow. before offering more aid to syrian rebel, the u.s. wants assurances that any new government would be democratic and inclusive. in other words, not dominated by radical islamists as he explained to congress this week. >> obviously there are dangers of extremists who are finding some funding and engaged in the battle and we want to try to separate them, if that is possible. >> u.s. aid would include military items such as body armor, communications equipment, and night vision goggles. but not weapons or ammunition. syrian opposition groups were there to demand more help from the international community. they argue the as
was then the news hour and now is the news hour with jim lair all the way. when you listen to the program you're going to get both sides. so we completely identify with the approach of u.s.a. today. but we live today i think all of us recognize in a much more partisan bitter maybe too strong a word but i think it fits in many ways. and some people say well it goes back to the election of 2000 and it's the war in iraq but i think it's more than that. i've seen it -- i was at cnn for 12 years, and you see it as you say in the e-mails you get from people. some people just are never are just not going to be happy. the thing that's reassuring to me though is that you get 150 e-mails from people saying you were tilting too far one way and you tilted too far the other way. and you want to be down the middle and you're going to get that kind of reaction. my question is though does it -- you know, we need to have a healthy debate about these issues but do you want people to be at each other's throats? and i think that's some of what's going on right now. and i think that's something we ought to contin
, they may have done it there or may have had a region, a quantum leap there, as jim was talking about, where will you develop those bomb-making skills? you don't go to m.i.t. to learn,build pressure cooker bombs, do you go to the caucuses, do you go to that area of the world where these devices have been used successfully to attack humanity for year upon year upon year. so i think that six-month period, the russians help us in that we may be able to identify who he was working with and gone to perhaps some type of terroristic training, bomb making school. realize the two brothers set some place. they built multiple pressure cooker bombs, built these hand-held devices. they did a lot. we have had fwhoermts u.s. try to blow their underwear up, try to blow their shoes up, try to blow their car up and they weren't successful, thank god. >> you think this goes beyond what they could pick up on the internet? >> i do i do. i think somebody sitting over their shoulder neath needed to be done. i don't think it was looking a this the seven or eight-page manual you could pull out of inspiration the al
people on the books, find out who they are. the issueur calls on of boy scouts of america we welcome jim to the conversation from oklahoma. good morning. the gay crowd wants to push how they live on uni. they should be able to decide their own rules and the government should be completely out of it. just like the gay marriage thing. if they want to get married, fine. if a certain church doesn't want to marry them, then so be it. the government should stay out of the whole issue. that's it. host: part of the debate this week on what to do with the alleged bomber involved in the killing of three bostonians over this past week. the headline, republicans want the boston bombing suspect treated as an enemy combatants, sparking miranda debate. key republicans are calling on the obama administration to declare the 19-year-old suspect an enemy combatant subject to the loss of four, so intelligence officials can continue to interrogate him for as long as they deem necessary. authorities captured him in watertown, mass. friday evening. they are invoking the public .afety exception he remains hospi
, that is the --. >> host: charles there is tweet relating to what you're saying. jim writes can an american citizen be considered an enemy combatant? >> guest: absolutely goes back to the civil war. goes certainly to world war ii. anwar al-awlaki was american-born. president obama use ad drone to kill him in the wilds of yemen. if you, if you fill eight yourself with enemy forces and you go to war against american citizens and you kill americans will fully and you do so on behalf of a movement or enemy forces then indeed you can be considered an enemy combatant. being a enemy combatant simply because you're an american citizen. if in world war ii you went over and joined nazi forces were you not a enemy combatant? of course you were. . . >> he didn't treat those terrible tragedies as access war, but appropriately treated them as heinous criminal acts to be investigated, prosecuted, and appropriately punishes. >> host: al-alwaki was an american citizen, kimed on orders of president obama. did president obama violate the constitution by doing that? >> guest: well, actually, we have a lawsuit in which
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)